Why is My Sensitive Plant Shriveling? (5 immediate solutions to do now)

a healthy pink mimosa pudica thats not shriveling

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I just bought a sensitive plant and it’s already starting to shrivel up!

Send help! What’s going on? 

Most people think that when your shy plant starts to wilt, it means that their mimosa pudica is dying. But that’s not always the case! In fact, there are a lot of reasons why your sensitive plant might be wilting, and most of them have nothing to do with death.

Keep reading to find out the five most common reasons why your sensitive plant is wilting, and how to fix the problem.

Why is my sensitive plant shriveling?

There are several reasons why a sensitive plant might start to wilt, including overwatering, underwatering, temperature fluctuations, nutrient deficiencies, pests or diseases, and stress.

Depending on the specific cause of your plant’s wilting, there are various steps you can take to help address the problem and get your sensitive plant back to health. Some possible solutions include:

  • regularly checking the soil moisture levels and watering as needed
  • providing plenty of sunlight
  • using a high-quality potting mix or fertilizer that is rich in essential nutrients
  • treating any pests or diseases that may be present
  • reducing stress on your plant by avoiding major environmental changes and handling it carefully.

With patience and attentive care, you should be able to get your sensitive plant back to its healthy, vibrant self in no time!

Causes of Mimosa Pudica shriveling

  1. Overwatering or underwatering can both cause your sensitive plant to wilt.
    1. If your soil is too wet, it may not be able to properly drain and absorb the nutrients that your plant needs to stay healthy, which can cause wilting.
    2. On the other hand, if your soil is too dry or your plant isn’t getting enough water, it may not be getting enough moisture to stay hydrated and healthy, which can also cause wilting.
  2. Temperature fluctuations can be another common cause of wilting in sensitive plants. If your plant isn’t able to get enough sunlight or is placed in an area with extremely hot or cold temperatures, it may start to wilt.
    1. Mimosa pudica enjoys warm, bright conditions with plenty of moisture and humidity.
  3. Nutrient deficiencies can also cause your sensitive plant to wilt. If your plant isn’t getting enough of the nutrients it needs from the soil, you may start to see symptoms such as wilting, yellowing leaves, reduced growth, or stunted growth.
    1. Try using a high-quality potting mix that is rich in essential nutrients, like nitrogen, potassium, phosphorus, calcium, and magnesium. Add fertilizer to your plant’s soil every month or as needed.
  4. Pests and diseases can also cause your sensitive plant to wilt. If your plant is infested with pests or has become infected with a fungal disease, it may start to wilt as it tries to fight off the invaders.
    1. Use pesticides or neem oil to treat any pests or diseases that may be present on your sensitive plant. Catch any pests early to help prevent their spread.
  5. Stress can also cause wilting in sensitive plants. If your plant is stressed due to changes in its environment or other factors, such as transplanting or being repotted, it may start to wilt as a result.
    1. Analyze your plant’s environment and care routine to identify any potential stressors, and try to reduce or eliminate them as much as possible.
    2. You may also want to handle your plant carefully, avoiding major trauma or sudden changes that could cause stress.

With some careful monitoring and attentive care, you should be able to get your sensitive plant back to health in no time!

What to do if your sensitive plant is shriveling up?

If your sensitive plant is wilting, the first step is to try to identify the cause. Once you know what is causing the problem, you can take steps to address it and get your plant back to health.

  • Overwatering: If you think that overwatering may be the cause of your plant’s wilting, try to reduce the amount of water it is getting or allow the soil to dry out a bit before watering again.
    • You may also want to check your soil moisture levels and make sure they are appropriate for sensitive plants.
  • Underwatering: On the other hand, if you suspect that your plant isn’t getting enough water, try regularly checking the soil moisture levels and watering your plant as needed.
    • You may also want to use a high-quality potting mix or fertilizer that is rich in essential nutrients for sensitive plants.
  • Temperature fluctuations: To address temperature fluctuations, try to find a spot in your home or garden where your plant will get plenty of sunlight and won’t be exposed to extreme hot or cold temperatures.
    • High humidity levels are also important for sensitive plants, so you may want to mist your plant regularly or use a humidifier if the air in your home is dry.
  • Nutrient deficiencies: If your plant seems to be lacking in nutrients, try using a high-quality potting mix or fertilizer that is rich in essential nutrients for sensitive plants.
    • You may also want to check the soil moisture levels and make sure they are appropriate for your plant.
  • Pests and diseases: If your plant is infested with pests or has become infected with a fungal disease, you’ll need to take steps to address the problem.
    • Try using an insecticide or fungicide that is specifically designed for sensitive plants. You may also want to quarantine your plant from other healthy plants to prevent the spread of the problem.
  • Stress: If you think that stress may be the cause of your plant’s wilting, try to reduce the amount of stress it is under by avoiding major environmental changes and handling it carefully, especially when transplanting or repotting.
    • You may also want to check the soil moisture levels and make sure they are appropriate for your plant.

Why is my sensitive plant wilting even though I water it regularly?

There are a number of possible reasons why your sensitive plant may be wilting or the leaves are falling off even though you water it regularly.

  • One possibility is that you’re overwatering or underwatering your plant.
  • Another possibility is that the temperature in its environment is fluctuating too much, it’s not getting enough sunlight, or it’s placed in an area with extremely hot or cold temperatures.
    • Provide plenty of sunlight and be sure to use a high-quality potting mix or fertilizer that is rich in essential nutrients.
  • Additionally, your plant may be suffering from nutrient deficiencies, pests or diseases, or stress, all of which can cause wilting.
    • Take steps to treat any pests or diseases that are present, and try to reduce stress on your plant by avoiding major environmental changes and handling them carefully.

With proper care and attention, you should be able to get your sensitive plant back to its healthy state in no time!

How often should I water my sensitive plant?

The frequency with which you need to water your sensitive plant will depend on a number of factors, including the

  • type of plant
  • the size of the pot
  • the climate
  • the time of year

In general, however, most sensitive plants need to be watered about once a week during the growing season (spring, summer, and fall).

During the winter months, when the plant is dormant, you may need to water less often, or you may be able to let the soil dry out completely between waterings. To figure out how often you should water your sensitive plant, it’s best to check the plant’s leaves and feel the top few inches of soil to see if they’re dry.

If they are, give your plant a thorough watering until water begins to drain from the bottom of the pot. Let the plant drain completely before placing it back in its normal location, as sensitive plants do not like to sit in water.

Final thoughts

If you are concerned that your sensitive plant is shriveling, the best thing you can do is take some steps to address the cause and help your plant recover.

This might include providing it with more sunlight or water, adjusting its temperature, treating any pests or diseases that may be infesting it, and reducing stress factors in its environment.

And remember, even if your sensitive plant doesn’t make a full recovery, there are plenty of other low-maintenance plants out there that would love to take its place.